Women’s marches bring thousands to Washington, D.C. and cities nationwide


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Protesters gather in Washington, DC, during the latest women’s rally, which began right after President Trump’s inauguration.

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Protesters gather in Washington, DC, during the latest women’s rally, which began right after President Trump’s inauguration.

Carol Josie for NPR

Updated at 6:08 PM ET

Thousands of people gathered on Saturday in Washington, DC and in hundreds of cities across the country for the fifth Women’s March.

The latest iteration of the protest event – which first took place the day after President Trump’s inauguration in 2017 – comes 17 days before Election Day, as Republican senators move quickly to confirm the president’s third nominee for the Supreme Court, Judge Amy Connie Barrett.

Jade Tesdall from Boston takes part in the Women’s March in Washington, DC on Saturday.

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Jade Tesdall from Boston takes part in the Women’s March in Washington, DC on Saturday.

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The controversial election year nomination was a major focus during this year’s events, spurring rallies and rallies throughout the day. If confirmed, Barrett will succeed feminist icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a feminist for nearly three decades on the court.

The support event held on Saturday in Washington was allowed to attend 10,000 people. Organizers said that in total, more than 400 events have been planned across the country.

Protesters rally in Washington, DC, against President Trump and the nomination of Judge Amy Connie Barrett for the Supreme Court.

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Protesters rally in Washington, DC, against President Trump and the nomination of Judge Amy Connie Barrett for the Supreme Court.

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As Election Day approaches two weeks, getting women to vote has been a major topic, along with other women’s rights issues.

in the capital , Sonya Spue“Donald Trump will leave office and he has no choice – it’s ours – and we vote for him on November 3,” said a reproductive rights activist.

Rocky wears the Ginsburg collar at the women’s march in Washington, DC

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Rocky wears the Ginsburg collar at the women’s march in Washington, DC

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One of the biggest events planned for Saturday took place in the capital, where nearly four years ago hundreds of thousands gathered the day after Trump was sworn in.

Despite being smaller than the historic crowd of 2017, women’s rights advocates have come in in droves.

Participants held banners critical of President Trump and endorsing Democratic opponent Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris.

Hundreds of people gathered in Boston Common for the fourth women’s march since Donald Trump took office in 2016.

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Hundreds of people gathered in Boston Common for the fourth women’s march since Donald Trump took office in 2016.

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Brianna Senk of Sunapee, New Hampshire holds a banner while attending the Boston Women’s March.

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Brianna Senk of Sunapee, New Hampshire holds a banner while attending the Boston Women’s March.

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A woman in leggings shows former Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg climbing a fence along the Boston Common.

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A woman in leggings shows former Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg climbing a fence along the Boston Common.

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Maria Jacobsen (left) from Pembork, Massachusetts and Madison Harakles (right) from Longmeadow, Massachusetts. They hold banners at the Boston women’s march.

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Maria Jacobsen (left) from Pembork, Massachusetts and Madison Harakles (right) from Longmeadow, Massachusetts. They hold banners at the Boston women’s march.

Meredith Nirman / WGBH

Many of the protesters focused on how Amy Connie Barrett and the more conservative Supreme Court affected abortion rights.

Alison Barnaby, 26, of Ellicott, Maryland, told NPR that she was concerned about it Ru vs. wade It could be upended and abortion rights eroded.

“The fact that I live in a country now that I feel anxious in, and never have to be in, is a very frightening idea,” said Barnaby.

Alison Barnaby, at the DC rally, said she was worried about it Ru vs. wade It could be upended and abortion rights eroded.

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Alison Barnaby, at the DC rally, said she was worried about it Ru vs. wade It could be upended and abortion rights eroded.

Sarah Macamon / NPR

The marches also brought crowds in front of the Supreme Court building. Pictures of the late Judge Ginsburg appeared in the crowd. At least one indication indicated Ginsburg’s request that the nomination process await the election results.

At a rally, Fatima Goss Graves of the National Women’s Legal Center described late justice as “the architect of our foundational rights” in the United States, and also delivered a speech against Trump’s candidate Barrett, saying that the hearings held this week had “no doubt” left her “It undermines our rights.”

“It will undermine our access to reproductive health and abortion care from voting rights to climate change. I have refused even to answer the basic questions,” Greaves told the audience.

The Senate Judiciary Committee plans to vote on Barrett’s nomination this week, which if successful, would mean a full vote later this month.

Elsewhere, participants in this year’s event confronted anti-abortion protesters – chanting, “We have the voices,” andRu vs. wade It should go “- gathered in the Supreme Court building.

Outside of Washington, protesters across the country carried the same messages.

In New York, protesters took to Wall Street chanting, “Donald Trump has to go,” according to ABC News reports.

Protesters gathered during a women’s march outside the New York Stock Exchange on Saturday in New York City.

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Protesters gathered during a women’s march outside the New York Stock Exchange on Saturday in New York City.

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A march that began in Philadelphia’s Independence Hall moved towards City Hall during the afternoon. Protesters seized the opportunity to incorporate racial justice and transgender rights alongside abortion rights during the Philadelphia event, Why reports.

Hundreds attended in Cleveland, According to WKSU. Ruth Gray of the Cleveland division of the National Conference of Black Women spoke before an event there, similarly touching on crossover topics.

“We have to deal with the issues in this country. The beliefs in this country. Systematic racism in this country. Systematic oppression in this country.” Gray said.

The protesters also gathered Downtown Chicago And other big cities.

Jackie Simons wears a letter mask while attending the Women’s March in downtown Chicago on Saturday.

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Jackie Simons wears a letter mask while attending the Women’s March in downtown Chicago on Saturday.

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Sister events were not restricted to major cities. In Geneva, Illinois, a city 40 miles west of Chicago, dozens of people congregate at an intersection, holding signs honoring Ginsburg, according to Northern Public Radio reports.


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